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Wisteria
Genus - Wisteria

Wisteria

Wisteria

Common Names - Wisteria
Growth Rate - Medium to Fast
Height - Up to 9m
Spread - Up to 5m
PositionFull sun or very light shade
Hardiness - Fully Hardy
Flowering PeriodMay to June
Flower Colour: White, Pink or Purple depending on cultivar
Habit - Twining climber. Wisteria is ideal for training into trees and covering walls, pergolas and other garden structures.
Soil Fertile, moist, well-drained soil
Origin - There are ten species of Wisteria native to the eastern United States and to China, Korea, and Japan. Japanese Wisteria grows to 25 feet tall and its blooms are 12 to 18 inches long. Chinese Wisteria is bigger and grows to more than 25 feet with flowers 6 to 12 inches long.
Wildlife Benefits
Buying notes - When buying Wisteria choose one that has been grown from cuttings or by grafting. Seed raised wisterias flower less reliably and also take longer to flower. Grafted plants can be detected by the visible bulge of the graft union near the base of the stem. Named cultivars are almost always grafted, whereas species plants may not be.
Wisteria available online from - Gardening Shop UK
Wisterias are beautifully aromatic deciduous climbers with spectacular hanging flowers. The twining stems grow in a clockwise manner, keep this in mind when training as a lot of energy can be wasted by the plant when trying to undo itself from a anticlockwise direction.
Wisteria is ideal for training up pergolas, trellis, wires and trees and is a popular climber in China and Japan.
There are ten species of wisteria native to the eastern United States and to China, Korea, and Japan. Japanese Wisteria grows to 25 feet tall and its blooms are 12 to 18 inches long. Chinese Wisteria is bigger and grows to more than 25 feet with flowers 6 to 12 inches long.
Wisterias can be trained against walls with the use of horizontal supports and on garden structures such as pergolas and as standards in pots and borders. When grown and shown correctly they can create a wonderful focal point in any garden. Originally growing in forests using trees as supports and taking nutrients from the leaf falls Wisteria will thrive in similar man made conditions in our gardens. Choose a spot that allows the roots to be shaded and the top growth to find the sun. Use well rotted manure, not fresh, when preparing the site as this can cause root burn on new plants. Maintain the area annually by adding a top dressing of organic matter every spring. Wisteria grows and flowers by searching for tree branches and winding the shoots clockwise around them, this can be imitated by using wire or structures. The wire should be placed along a wall or a fence in horizontal lines ensuring the wire is securely attached. When training the plant to the wire twist the shoot in a clockwise direction or the plant will simply untwist itself and waste energy in doing so.
Young plants grown from seeds can take up to 20 years to flower, the varieties listed below are grafted onto mature rootstock to ensure quick flowering.
Wisteria Pruning
Young Wisteria - Choose a Wisteria with short flower trusses to display against walls and fences. Space the branches 40-60cm apart initially and thin if needed as the plant spreads out with regular pruning. Wisteria with longer flower trusses show best on pergolas and arches. For standard trained Wisteria you need a young single-stemmed plant and a strong stake of the length that you require your plant to grow to that is not going to rot or give way whilst the plant is growing. Once you have allowed the plant to grow outwards it will no longer continue to grow upwards. Once the desired height has been achieved remove the tip in late winter, this will cause side shoots to grow at the top thus building up a head of branches. To encourage this further prune every winter to 15-30cm or if the shoots are weak or damaged prune back completely. Late summer pruning can start once the head is developing, prune back to above the 7th leaf all shoots that you do not require and then prune again in late winter to within 3cm of their bases.
Mature Wisteria - Established Wisteria requires bi-annual pruning for optimum flowering and to keep control over the growth and size of the plant. In late summer prune all of the current side-shoot growths to 30cms leaving only the shoots you require to replace any worn out branches or those you wish to train on. In late winter hard pruning is required to promote growth and flowering. Cut back to within 5cms of the main stem above a bud, again leaving only the shoots you require to extend the growth of the plant or to cover bare spaces.
Pruning Summary
Why - Wisteria needs pruning to keep the growth down to a manageable size as well as improving the flowering vigour.

Watch - Keep an eye on Wisteria getting into building fabric like guttering, fascias and prevent from covering windows.

When - Twice a year. Winter prune in January, Summer prune in July.

Summer Prune - Prune the current seasons shoots right down to 5 or 6 leaves after flowering.

Winter Prune - When the plant is dormant cut back the same shoots to two or three buds.

Wisteria available online from - Gardening Shop UK

Wisteria Gallery

Wisteria -  publicdomainpictures.net
Wisteria -  Pixabay
Wisteria -  Pixabay
Wisteria -  Pixabay
Wisteria -  Pixabay

 

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